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Category Archives: Album Reviews

Sleepsculptor—Entry: Dispersal

by Tom Springer While a spinoff of the metalcore genre itself, mathcore is filled with its own sub genres, spinoffs, and variations. On one end you have the slightly more accessible bands that pull more from emo, metalcore, and even alt rock and on the

The Callous Daoboys—Die on Mars

by Tom Springer It’s not every day that a band like the Callous Daoboys or an album like Die On Mars comes around. An album that leaves you utterly speechless at the end, in shock and awe over what you just experienced. Once it actually

Sharptooth—Transitional Forms

By Tom Springer Out to prove exactly why they deserve that 100K a show, metalcore money, Sharptooth have dropped their latest release Transitional Forms for us to digest. The album brings something different to the table than just straightforward metalcore with often tongue in cheek

The Used—Heartwork

by Tom Springer The Used have always been a band that has played around with their sound. From their debut heavy screamo self titled album that helped bring forth the genre to the mainstream with songs like The Taste Of Ink that saw regular radio

Enter Shikari—Nothing is True & Everything is Possible

By Tom Springer Venerable rave rockers Enter Shikari are back with their latest album called Nothing Is True & Everything Is Possible. Their previous album The Spark was a departure in sound for the band with a lot less chaos, lighter electronics, and overall a

Dance Gavin Dance—Afterburner

by Tom Springer Every time I talk about a new Dance Gavin Dance album my reaction is the same: This is the best they’ve ever done. While I still hold 2016’s Mothership in high regards, their last album, Artificial Selection has unfortunately lost its luster

Dance Gavin Dance—Afterburner

by Tom Springer Every time I talk about a new Dance Gavin Dance album my reaction is the same: This is the best they’ve ever done. While I still hold 2016’s Mothership in high regards, their last album, Artificial Selection has unfortunately lost its luster